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My Lesson Plans:

 

Math

 

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others are listed below:

Lesson Plan:

Scott Engle

 

Lesson Title:              Animal Poetry

Grade Level(s):          Fifth

 

Key/Essential

Question:                    What is the value of wildlife?

 

Curriculum

Standards:                   PA Academic Standards

Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening – 1.4.5 A - Write poems, plays and multi-paragraph stories.  Include detailed descriptions of people, places and things.

Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening – 1.6.5 D - Contribute to discussions.  Listen to and acknowledge the contributions of others.

Environmental Education – 4.7.7 A - Describe diversity of plants and animals in ecosystems.

Environmental Ed. – 3.3.7 A – Know the similarities and differences that characterize diverse living things.

 

Key Concepts/

Enduring

Understandings:        

Students will recognize and understand the inspirational value of wildlife.                                                              Students will know about a specific animal that they investigated and be able to describe that animal in descriptive words through poetry.

 

Key Skills:                 

Students will be able to compare animals and their value.  They will be able to explain how wildlife impacts us each and every day.  Students will analyze descriptive words about the animals and assemble these words into a meaningful poem that describes the beauty and value of their animal.

 

Materials:                  

Writing materials: pens, pencils, paper, crayons, Edge of the Pond by Jennifer Owens Dewey, Ranger Rick

 

Introductory Activity:

Listening to nature while just sitting in the park or outside can be a great experience.  Sometimes we see animals

and others don’t so we need to describe to them what we saw.  Today we are going to think of our favorite wild

animal and create a poem that describes it so that others and ourselves can remember this animal and its value.

(5 min.)

 

Evidence of                

Understanding:          

Students’ performance will be measured by the finished product as well as observations throughout the process.  The teacher will be able to observe learning taking place and during group work will be able to walk around to take notes.  In the end the Haiku as well as the drawing will be observed by the teacher as an assessment to whether learning took place or not.

 

Learning Experiences

And Instruction:        

Overview: Students will be drawing and discussing the picture that they drew for the presentation to get them

interested in the animal as well as to aide in their thoughts of descriptive words from their poem.  While in groups,

students will describe and compare their drawings of animals and list some descriptive words that tell about their

animals.  The teacher will facilitate a discussion with the students about what descriptive (adjectives) words are. 

The student’s role is to respond to the teacher’s discussion while elaborating upon his/her picture and demonstrate

their knowledge of their animal.  This experience provides a student-centered approach to learning while engaging

students in the process of analyzing an animal of their choice.  By using the sketch-to-stretch method as well as the

poetry allows students to achieve personal expression through fine arts.  Discussion about the animal will lead

students to conclusions why wildlife should be valued while achieving proficiency performing tasks or assessments. 

By sharing and comparing their drawings with others the students are able to learn about other animals as well as

other students.  The student’s achievement will be assessed through observation from the teacher and also by their

poem/drawing.  By looking at these two works the teacher will be able to get a good idea if the students reached

the goal.  Through both of the activities students will discover what the value of wildlife is.

 

 

Developmental Activity –

1.       Students will be shown images from Ranger Rick to get them thinking about animals.

2.       The teacher will show a video clip about animals.

3.       Students will draw an animal of their choice.

4.       Students will get into groups to discuss their animals they drew.

5.       The teacher will discuss and model descriptive words with the class.

6.       Students will list descriptive words of their animal and talk about why their animal is important to wildlife. 

 

-By doing this the students will see what the value of wildlife is as well as brainstorm a list that will aid them in the next process of the lesson.

(25 min.)

 

Application Activity –

1.       The teacher will distribute and discuss nature poems and poems written in Haiku form.

2.       The teacher will then explain a Haiku poem that consists of three lines of five, seven and five syllables.

3.       The students will be told to close their eyes and imagine being that animal that they drew.  This will help the student picture more accurately what the animal’s environment is like and may help the students concentrate more on the activity. 

4.       Students will be told to take their list of words describing their animal and create a Haiku poem.  With the descriptive words and under the drawing of their animal each student will write a Haiku describing their animal. 

5.       Once the poem is complete, students will share them with the class and they will be displayed on a bulletin board. 

6.       The teacher will ask evaluative questions about the value of nature and about what students have learned. 

7.       Students will discuss why they think nature is of value and how their thoughts have change. (25 min.)

 

 

Lesson Plan  

 

Lesson Title:              Inclusion

Grade Level(s):          First - Third

 

Key/Essential

Question:                    Why is it important for everyone to be included?

 

Curriculum

Standards:                   NCSS Thematic Standards

IV – Individual Development and Identity – Personal identity is shaped by one’s culture, by groups, and by institutional influences.  Examination of various forms of human behavior enhances understanding of the relationships between social norms and emerging personal identities, the social processes that influence identity formation, and the ethical principles underlying individual action.

                                   

PA Academic Standards

Arts – 9.1.3 E - Demonstrate the ability to define objects, express emotions, illustrate an action or relate an experience through creation of works in the arts.

Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening-1.2.3 A - Read and understand essential content of informational texts and documents in all academic areas.  Make inferences from text when studying a topic (e.g., science, social studies) and draw conclusions based on text.

 

Key Concepts/

Enduring

Understandings:         Students will understand why it is important to include everyone and

            how although everyone is different, they can all contribute.

 

Key Skills:                  Students will be able to compare multiple perspectives and explain how

including everyone is beneficial.  Students will create solutions to problems that involve including all people in everyday life.

 

Materials:                   Rainbow Fish to the Rescue, paper, crayons, pencils, speech, photos

 

Introductory Activity: Have you ever felt left out?  Was there ever a time where you or someone else was not included?  Today we will be reading a book about a fish that was left out and not included just because he was different.  Throughout the book I want you to think about how the fish felt and why it is important to include everyone. (5 min.)

 

 

 

 

Learning Experiences

And Instruction:         Students will be discussing the picture that they drew in a sketch-to-stretch format.  While in groups, students will describe and compare their drawings and talk about what the pictures mean.  The teacher will facilitate a discussion with the students about what it means for the little striped fish to be included in the group.  The student’s role is to respond to the teacher’s discussion while elaborating upon his/her picture and demonstrate their knowledge of why it is important.  This experience provides a student-centered approach to learning while engaging students in the process of analyzing children’s literature.  By using the sketch-to-stretch method it allows students to achieve personal expression through fine arts and a central idea that they adopted from the story.  Discussion about the book will lead students to conclusions about including different types of people while achieving proficiency performing tasks or assessments.  By sharing and comparing their drawings with others the students are able to consider other views about the book and its meaning.

 

Developmental Activity – The teacher will read Rainbow Fish to the Rescue to the class.  Students will be asked various questions about the book and how it relates to including all people.  Ask about how the striped fish felt in different parts of the story.  Make sure to show all pictures.  Ask students to think, at various points and the end of the story, about why it was important to include the striped fish. (15 min.)

 

Application Activity – Students will be told to draw a picture relating to the story of Rainbow Fish to the Rescue.  The picture that they draw is to show an emotion that was brought about when they heard the story.  After drawing the picture students will be put into groups to discuss what their picture represents as well as compare and get new ideas from others. (10 min.) 

 

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